LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND. Mayor of Liverpool, Joanne Anderson at the Cunard Building on 21 May 2021. Picture: Jennifer Bruce/Liverpool City Council.

BLOG: Culture is the Prize

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Mayor of Liverpool Joanne Anderson reflects on what a difference a week makes, and talks about her pride that the prestigious Turner Prize is returning to the city.

Another week, another announcement for Liverpool – but a very different one this time.

The news that the Turner Prize is returning to Liverpool – on our beautiful waterfront – is a celebratory moment for our city. This announcement continues our upwards trajectory of this city, but also brings us full circle.

The Turner Prize first came to Liverpool in 2007 and it was the first time for it to be showcased outside of London. It was the first event in the city’s European Capital of Culture year and the first time many visitors had visited this beautiful, culturally rich port city.

Not only have we hosted the Turner Prize, but also, a collective of brilliant architects working alongside a community, have won the prize.  ‘Assemble’ curated the Granby Four Streets development, using artistry and brilliant design to reimagine the Victorian terraces that run alongside Princes Avenue.  And from this development, led by artists, we have seen the refurbishment of Princes Avenue, with the words of the community literally running through the stone we walk upon.

In September, I will be setting out my vision for development in this great city. In this, it will be clear how we will always respect both the physical and oral histories of our buildings and communities, and yet maintain the energy to create a new journey for us all. How we think about regeneration and how we make the right place for our future, our children and for our culture and the arts will be at the core of that.

Artists and creatives bring a freshness, debate and deep thinking to our lives. Our galleries, our streets and our city is better for them. The pandemic has heightened our awareness of the value of the arts, and how having access to cultural institutions is hugely beneficial for our mental health, so it’s a joy to be able to visit them once again.

I am grateful to Maria Balshaw and Helen Legg for bringing the Turner Prize back to its northern home, and I also thank them for their belief and commitment to Tate Liverpool – both the work within the gallery – and the work outside

But thank you most of all to the artists

Mayor Joanne

Liverpool Waterfront