UPDATED – COVID-19 measures: Frequently Asked Questions

Last updated:

UPDATE: THURSDAY 22 OCTOBER

The Government is to allow gyms, indoor sports facilities, fitness and dance studios in Liverpool and the wider city region to reopen from Saturday 24 October.

They were included in Tier 3 restrictions which came into force on Wednesday 14 October in a bid to drive down COVID-19 infection rates.

However, local leaders successfully argued that it was unfair because the venues have not been included in the restrictions for other Tier 3 areas, such as Lancashire and Greater Manchester.

The following council-run Lifestyles fitness centres will open on Saturday 24th October:

Alsop
Garston
Ellergreen
Cardinal Heenan
Liverpool Aquatics Centre

Sessions must be booked online – more information is available at: https://liverpool.gov.uk/lifestyles/reopening-of-lifestyles/

However, in order to bring Liverpool City Region in line with other Tier 3 areas, soft play centres will have to close from Saturday.

UPDATE: TUESDAY 13 OCTOBER

Liverpool, along with Halton, Knowsley, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral is being placed into the ‘very high’ alert level of the Government’s new three-tier system of interventions to tackle the spread of COVID-19.

It means the city and the wider Liverpool City Region will, from Wednesday 14 October, be under the strictest set of restrictions due to the high rate of infection in the area.

The new restrictions include:

Pubs and bars will close. They can only remain open where they operate as if they were a restaurant – which means serving substantial meals, like a main lunchtime or evening meal. They may only serve alcohol as part of such a meal

Indoor gyms and fitness/dance studios, sports facilities, leisure centres, betting shops, adult gaming centres and casinos will close. UPDATE: Indoor gyms and fitness/dance studios, sports facilities, leisure centres can reopen from Saturday 24 October.

UPDATE: Soft play centres have to close from Saturday 24 October

Wedding receptions will not be permitted, although services can go-ahead with a limit of 15 people

People should try to avoid travelling outside their local area, or entering another area rated Very High other than for work, education, accessing youth services, or to meet caring responsibilities

People should avoid staying overnight in another part of the UK if they are resident in the Liverpool City Region and avoid staying overnight in the Liverpool City Region if they are resident elsewhere.

In addition:

You must not socialise with anybody beyond those you live with (or have formed a support bubble with) in any indoor setting or in any private garden or at most outdoor hospitality venues and ticketed events

You must not socialise in a group of more than 6 in an outdoor public space such as a park or beach, the countryside, a public garden or a sports venue

However:

Schools and universities remain open

Places of worship remain open, but household mixing is not permitted

Exemptions apply for indoor activities involving young people, people with disabilities, elite sports people, professional dancers and choreographers

Lifestyles leisure centres are hosting some children’s and elite activities from Friday 16 October – read more here.

We have updated the Frequently Asked Questions below to reflect the latest measures, and will add more detail when we receive it.

What are the new and existing measures?

From 00.01 on Wednesday 14 October, the Liverpool City Region will be placed into the ‘Very High’ alert level of the Government’s three-tier system of interventions to tackle the spread of Covid-19. The means the area will be under the strictest set of restrictions due to the high rate of infection in the area. The following regulations are in place Liverpool City Region:

• Pubs and bars will close. They can only remain open where they operate as if they were a restaurant – which means serving substantial meals, like a main lunchtime or evening meal. They may only serve alcohol as part of such a meal

• Indoor gyms and fitness or dance studios, sports facilities, leisure centres, betting shops, adult gaming centres and casinos will close. UPDATE: Indoor gyms and fitness/dance studios, sports facilities and leisure centres can reopen from Saturday 24 October.

UPDATE: Soft play centres have to close from Saturday 24 October

• Wedding receptions will not be permitted

• People should try to avoid travelling outside their local area, or entering another area rated Very High other than for work, education, accessing youth services, or to meet caring responsibilities

• People should avoid staying overnight in another part of the UK if they are resident in the Liverpool City Region and avoid staying overnight in the Liverpool City Region if they are resident elsewhere

• You must not meet socially with friends and family indoors in any setting unless they are part of your household or support bubble. This includes private homes and indoors in hospitality venues, such as pubs. You must also not meet with people outside of your household or support bubble in a private garden or in most outdoor public venues
In the affected local areas, it is also advised that people should:

• Not visit friends or family in care homes, other than in exceptional circumstances. Care homes should restrict visits to these circumstances.

• Only use public transport for essential purposes, such as travelling to school or work.

• Only take holidays within your household group or support bubble.

• Avoid attending amateur and semi-professional sporting events as spectators
The new measures will be kept under constant review to reduce the spread of the virus and save lives.

Which businesses must close?

A pub, bar or other business which sells alcohol for consumption on the premises must close. They can only remain open where they operate as if they were a restaurant – which means serving substantial meals, like a main lunchtime or evening meal. They may only serve alcohol as part of such a meal.

In addition, the following businesses must also close:
• nightclubs
• dance halls
• discotheques
• sexual entertainment venues
• hostess bars
• casinos
• betting shops and adult gaming centres
• indoor gyms, fitness and dance studios (UPDATE: They can reopen on 24 October)
• indoor sports facilities (UPDATE: They can reopen on 24 October

UPDATE: Soft play centres have to close from Saturday 24 October

However, this does not prevent the use of:

• any premises used for a restricted business or service to host blood donation sessions

• facilities for training by elite sportspersons, including indoor gyms, fitness studios and indoor sports facilities

• indoor fitness and dance studios by professional dancers and choreographers

• indoor gyms, fitness studios and indoor sports facilities for supervised activities for children, or by persons who have a disability and who are not elite sportspersons to take part in any sport or other fitness related activity; or

• any other specified retail activity

The following businesses must close between the hours of 10pm to 5am.

• restaurants, including restaurants and dining rooms in hotels or members’ clubs

• businesses providing food or drink prepared on the premises for immediate consumption off the premises, but not including: supermarkets, convenience stores, corner shops and newsagents, pharmacists and chemists, or petrol stations

• cafes, including workplace canteens, but not including— cafes or canteens at a hospital, care home or school, canteens at criminal justice accommodation or an establishment intended for use for naval, military or air force purposes or for the purposes of the Department of the Secretary of State responsible for defence, or services providing food or drink to the homeless

• bars, including bars in hotels or members’ clubs

• public houses

• social clubs

This also applies to bowling alleys, cinemas, theatres, amusement arcades or other indoor leisure centres, funfairs (indoors or outdoors), theme parks and adventure parks and activities, bingo halls, and concert halls.

Businesses may continue during the restricted hours:

• for the delivery of takeaway food and drink if ordered over the phone or online. Collection of takeaway food or drink is permitted if the customer remains in their vehicle or does not enter the premises

• if the business is a motorway service area and no alcohol is sold in the restricted hours

• if the business is operated in the restricted area of an airport or port

• if the business is operated as a workplace canteen

If the restricted business or service is provided at a cinema, theatre or concert hall, they may continue after 10pm for the purpose of concluding a performance which began before that time.

Food and drink on licenced premises must be ordered and consumed whilst the customer is seated.

Businesses which provide food and drink where no alcohol is served for consumption on the premises must take all reasonable steps to ensure it is consumed whilst the customer is seated. If the business is a cinema, theatre or concert hall, the food or drink does not need to be ordered while seated, but they must take reasonable steps to ensure it is consumed whilst seated.

Businesses must continue to take details of customers for NHS Test and Trace.

What are the rules around household and social mixing?

• You must not socialise with anybody you do not live with, or have formed a support bubble with, in any indoor setting or in any private garden or at most outdoor hospitality venues and ticketed events

• Gatherings of up to 6 people are permitted at public outdoor places where no payment is required or any public outdoor place that can be categorised as outdoor sports grounds or sports facilities; botanical gardens; gardens or grounds of a castle, stately home or historic house. A ‘public outdoor place’ is ‘an outdoor place to which the public have or are permitted access’.

Residents are also advised to adhere to the following guidance to further reduce rates of infection:

• Only use public transport for essential purposes, such as travelling to school or work, getting food, medicine or for health and wellbeing related reasons

• People should try to avoid travelling outside their local area, or entering another area rated Very High other than for work, education, accessing youth services, or to meet caring responsibilities

• People should avoid staying overnight in another part of the UK if they are resident in the Liverpool City Region and avoid staying overnight in the Liverpool City Region if they are resident elsewhere

• Not attend amateur and semi-professional sporting events as spectators

Where are the measures being introduced in our area?

Liverpool, Wirral, Sefton, Knowsley, St Helens and Halton.

Why are the measures being introduced?

These measures will help to address the significant rise in coronavirus cases in the region in recent weeks.

There is an increased risk of transmission the more people who gather together. Our data shows an increased rate of transmission in homes, at parties, pubs and restaurants.

We are doing everything we can to protect our most vulnerable, keep businesses open and children in school, which these measures will help with.

How long will it last?

The tier-3 measures for Liverpool City Region, introduced on 14 October, will be reviewed monthly.

Most of the national measures which began on 3 October will be in place until March 2021.

What are the exemptions for people coming in to my home?

 People should only come inside your home for specific purposes:

• where everyone in the gathering lives together or is in the same support bubble

• to attend a birth at the mother’s request

• to visit a person who is dying (the visitor can be someone the dying person lives with, a close family member, friend or, if none of those is visiting, anyone else)

• to fulfil a legal obligation

• for work purposes, or for the provision of voluntary or charitable services

• for the purposes of education or training

• for the purposes of childcare provided by a registered provider

• for the purposes of childcare for children under the age of 14 or vulnerable adults, when it is necessary for caring purposes

• to provide emergency assistance

• to enable one or more persons in the gathering to avoid injury or illness or to escape a risk of harm

• to facilitate a house move

• to provide care or assistance to a vulnerable person

• to continue existing arrangements for access to, and contact between, parents and children where the children do not live in the same household as their parents, or one of their parents.

Do any of the measures affect childcare?

You can continue to use early years and childcare settings, including childminders and providers offering before or after school clubs or other out-of-school settings for children. You can also continue to employ nannies, including those living outside of the region.

Children of parents who are separated can continue to move between households.

Formal and informal arrangements for caring for children under 14 or vulnerable adults can continue. An example would include where a grandparent looks after a child so a parent can go out to work. Or taking them and picking them up from school. It does not allow for play dates and parties.

What is a support bubble?

A support bubble is a close support network between a household with only one adult in the home (known as a single-adult household) and one other household of any size.

Once you’re in a support bubble, you can think of yourself as being in a single household with people from the other household. It means you can have close contact with that household as if they were members of your own household.

Once you make a support bubble, you should not change who is in your bubble.

You should not have multiple bubbles.

Do these measures affect access to education?

No. Schools, colleges and universities remain open and are operating in a COVID-secure way. University students must follow the specific guidance and rules set by their university.

Does my child need to wear a face covering at school?

Unless exempt, in education settings where students in Year 7 and above are educated, including middle schools, face coverings should be worn by staff, visitors and students when moving around in corridors and communal areas.

Parents must wear a face covering when dropping off and picking up children at school, and socially distance from others.

Can I travel outside the area for work or school?

Yes, people living inside and outside of these areas can continue to travel for work or school. Workplaces and schools themselves should also be implementing Covid-secure measures.

Can I go to someone’s house in an area not subject to the restrictions?

You should not visit anyone’s home inside or outside of the restricted area (except for your support bubble).

Can I go to a care home?

You should not visit friends or family in care homes, other than in exceptional circumstances. An example would include someone receiving end-of-life care. Care homes should restrict visits to these circumstances.

If you are planning to visit relatives in care homes outside the affected areas, then check with the care home prior to travelling to ensure that they are still open to visits from family members.

Can I still go to a hospitality venue or public venues with people who don’t live with me?

You must not socialise with anybody beyond those you live with (or have formed a support bubble with), in any indoor setting or in most outdoor hospitality venues, including beer gardens and ticketed events.

Gatherings of up to 6 people are permitted at public outdoor places where no payment is required or any public outdoor place that can be categorised as outdoor sports grounds or sports facilities; botanical gardens; gardens or grounds of a castle, stately home or historic house. A ‘public outdoor place’ is ‘an outdoor place to which the public have or are permitted access’.

People are advised to only visit COVID-safe premises that are visibly adhering to the guidelines.

Customers need to wear a face covering when not sat at a table for food or drink, and staff must wear one at all times.

Why can I visit a restaurant but not my relative’s house?

This is because the hospitality industry has enhanced measures, such as risk assessments and test and trace, which private homes don’t have.

Can I buy food or drink from takeaways from 10pm – 5am?

No. However, takeaways can deliver to your home if you place an order by phone or online.

Are rules changing for other businesses?

Businesses need to display the official NHS QR code posters so that customers can ‘check-in’ at different premises using this option as an alternative to providing their contact details once the app is rolled out nationally. In addition, guidance stating that face coverings and visors should be worn in close contact services will now become law.

Businesses and organisations have to make their premises COVID-Secure. The rules are:

Leisure and entertainment venues, services provided in community centres, and close contact services are subject to the COVID-19 Secure requirements in law.

Employers must not knowingly require or encourage someone who is being required to self-isolate to come to work.

Businesses must remind people to wear face coverings where mandated.

What are the penalties for breaching the regulations for individuals and businesses?

Fixed penalty notices can be issued to individuals in respect of any offences in the regulations:

· £200 (£100 if paid within 14 days)

· £400 for the second

· £800 for the third

· £1,600 for the fourth

· £3,200 for the fifth

· £6,400 for the sixth and any subsequent fixed penalty notices

Businesses can be fined by local authorities or the police if they fail to fulfil the obligations placed on them in law. Fines will be issued:

· £1,000 for the first offence

· £2,000 for the second offence

· £4,000 for the third offence

· and then £10,000 for the fourth and all subsequent offences

Working from home

To help contain the virus, office workers who can work effectively from home should do so over the winter.

Where an employer, in consultation with their employee, judges an employee can carry out their normal duties from home they should do so.

Public sector employees working in essential services, including education settings, should continue to go into work where necessary.

Anyone else who cannot work from home should go to their place of work.

The risk of transmission can be substantially reduced if COVID-19 secure guidelines are followed closely. Extra consideration should be given to those people at higher risk.

Can my wedding go ahead?

Weddings and civil partnership ceremonies are limited to 15 people.

Wedding receptions and civil partnership celebrations are not allowed.

Anyone working at these ceremonies or events are not included as part of the person limit.

These events should comply with the COVID-19 Secure guidance and venue capacity. See detailed guidance for small marriages and civil partnerships.

Can people living outside Merseyside come to my wedding?

People living outside of Liverpool City Region can travel to our area to attend a wedding, civil partnership ceremony or funeral, but they must not meet with another household in a private home or garden. They should avoid staying overnight.

How many people can attend a funeral? 

A maximum of 30 people should attend a funeral.

Anyone working at these ceremonies or events are not included as part of the person limit.

All other religious or belief-based standalone life cycle ceremonies or celebrations are limited to 6 people if outdoors and only one household and support bubble indoors.

Wakes are limited to 15 people and you cannot host a wake for anyone outside your own household or support bubble in your home or garden.

Gatherings in a hospitality setting are limited to 6 people and you must socially distance with those not from your household.

Do the restrictions apply to places of worship?

You may attend a mosque, church, synagogue, temple or other place or worship, but you should socially distance from people outside of your household. This means maintaining a distance of 2 metres, or 1 metre with mitigations (such as wearing face coverings).

If possible, prayer or religious services should take place outdoors.

What are the changes to playing sports?

Unless formally organised by a sports club or similar organisation, with guidance issued by a sports governing body, team sports should not take place at an indoor venue with people who you don’t live with. A maximum of six people are allowed to take part in an adult team sport. There are exemptions for:

facilities for training by elite sportspersons, including indoor gyms, fitness studios and indoor sports facilities

indoor fitness and dance studios by professional dancers and choreographers

indoor gyms, fitness studios and indoor sports facilities for supervised activities for children

or by persons who have a disability and who are not elite sportspersons to take part in any sport or other fitness related activity

You can continue to take part in organised sporting or licensed physical activity in groups of more than 6 outdoors and only one household and support bubble (for over 18s) indoors.

Outdoor activities either need to be organised by a national governing body, club, registered instructor/coach, business or charity, and/or involve someone who has received an official licence to use equipment relevant to the activity. In all cases, the organiser must conduct a risk assessment and ensure compliance with COVID-19 Secure guidance.

You should only be playing team sports where the relevant governing body has published guidance on how to do so safely and is outdoors. See a list of team sports governing bodies which have developed guidance. For all other sports, guidance is available from your governing body and details on how to safely undertake this activity within an organised environment.

Organised dance and exercise classes can take place in groups of more than 6 outdoors, where a risk assessment has been carried out, but you must not mix with more than five other participants. The relevant indoor sport facilities guidance or outdoor guidance must be followed for these activities. Outdoor organised sport and physical activity events are allowed provided they follow guidance for the public on the phased return of outdoor sport and recreation in England.

We advise that you should not attend amateur or professional sporting events as a spectator in the affected local areas. If you do attend, you must remain socially distanced and groups of no more than 6 when outdoors (and if indoors only with your household or support bubble).

What are the grassroots football restrictions?

All Liverpool City Council operated grass and 3g pitches remain open with the following restrictions in place:

No spectators are allowed to attend any adult amateur football match taking place on Liverpool City Council operated grass or 3g pitches. Only the referee, players and manager of each team should attend matches.

For junior football matches, one parent or guardian will be allowed to attend a match with their child.

It is mandatory that face coverings are worn in all publically accessible indoor areas such as changing pavilion toilets.

Travel within the LCR (Areas of Liverpool, Knowsley, Sefton, St Helens, Wirral and Halton) is permitted.

Travel in/out of the LCR Area is permitted only for work purposes, i.e. referees.

We would ask that all teams/leagues be extra vigilant during this period of Tier 3 restrictions.

We would also once again like to remind teams that where we have pavilions/facilities on site these remain accessible for use of the toilets only, with face coverings mandatory, changing rooms and showers remain closed.

Anyone entering the building needs to scan the QR codes clearly displayed in the communal areas to access the NHS Track & Trace app. Team signing in sheets remain in use and should be completed promptly on arrival.

For those teams that play on 3G hub sites the signing in process already in place at these facilities should continue to be followed.

We understand that the restrictions above, which will be reviewed in line with government Covid 19 legislation, may cause inconvenience but it is vital that they followed to enable grassroots football to continue in a safe manner whilst keeping infection rates in the Liverpool City region as low as possible.

Can I travel to play sport outside of the areas with restrictions?

People should try to avoid travelling outside their local area, or entering another area rated Very High other than for work, education, accessing youth services, or to meet caring responsibilities

Can I go to the gym, gym class or a swimming pool?

Gyms and leisure centres can reopen from Saturday 24 October.

The following council-run Lifestyles fitness centres will open on this date:

Alsop
Garston
Ellergreen
Cardinal Heenan
Liverpool Aquatics Centre

Sessions must be booked online – more information is available at: https://liverpool.gov.uk/lifestyles/reopening-of-lifestyles/

Can I go to the park and other outdoor space with others?

You must not socialise in a group of more than 6 in an outdoor public space such as a park or beach, the countryside, a public garden or a sports venue.

Can I have someone in my house (or go into someone’s house) to do repairs or other work?

Official/registered tradespeople can go to other people’s homes for work purposes as long as you follow national guidance on how to work safely there.

Can I still go on holiday?

People should try to avoid travelling outside their local area, or entering another area rated Very High other than for work, education, accessing youth services, or to meet caring responsibilities

People should avoid staying overnight in another part of the UK if they are resident in the Liverpool City Region and avoid staying overnight in the Liverpool City Region if they are resident elsewhere.

Travel and transport

You should follow all relevant transport guidance when making a journey into, within or out of the affected local areas.

You must wear a face covering on public transport, taxis and private hire vehicles (PHVs) and in substantially enclosed areas of transport hubs in England (as well as other indoor premises).

You will be breaking the law if you fail to do so and could be fined. Some people do not have to wear a face covering including for age, health, or disability reasons.

You should minimise non-essential travel when travelling into, within and out of the affected local areas. We encourage you to walk or cycle where possible and to plan your journey in advance, avoiding busy times and routes if possible. Examples of essential travel include:

  • to get to and from work
  • to get essential food or medical supplies including click and collect services
  • to support someone who is vulnerable, if no one else can do so
  • to travel to and from the homes of others in your support bubble
  • to attend an early years setting, school or college, or to accompany a child who is attending an early years setting, school, college or university where necessary
  • to fulfil legal obligations
  • to seek medical care, or avoid illness, injury or harm

You should also try not to share a car with those outside your household or support bubble. If you need to, try to:

  • share the car with the same people each time
  • keep to small groups of people at any one time
  • open windows for ventilation
  • travel side by side or behind other people, rather than facing them, where seating arrangements allow
  • consider seating arrangements to maximise distance between people in the vehicle
  • clean your car between journeys using standard cleaning products – make sure you clean door handles and other areas that people may touch
  • ask the driver and passengers to wear a face covering

See more guidance on car sharing and travelling with people outside your household group.

Liverpool City Council was the first in the country to approve a locally-designed protective screen for taxis and private hire vehicles.

Are the airport, train stations and ports still open?

Yes

Can I move home?

Yes

What about people who were previously shielding?

The government has issued guidance to clinically vulnerable people who were previously asked to shield from Covid-19.

The national shielding programme paused at the end of July 2020 and clinically extremely vulnerable people in Liverpool do not need to shield at the moment.

The new guidelines have been updated to reflect restrictions imposed through the new tier system, which has seen Liverpool placed in Tier 3 – the highest category of alert due to the city’s steep rise in the infection rate.

The new guidance is set out in 2 parts:

  1. Updated advice on protecting the clinically extremely vulnerable, based on the local COVID alert level in your area. This advice is less restrictive than previous shielding advice.
  2. Updated shielding advice that is more targeted and will only apply in some of the worst affected areas and only for a limited period of time. You are only advised to follow shielding advice if you receive a new written shielding notification.
While previous shielding guidance helped protect those most at risk from COVID-19, many people reported that they found the advice very restrictive.

Since the introduction of shielding, many new measures have been introduced in our communities, including the rule of 6, COVID-secure workplaces, and the widespread use of face coverings, all of which have reduced the need for such restrictive shielding advice.

The government also has better data on new infections and has introduced local COVID alert levels, with rules and advice based on the level of risk in a local area.

This updated guidance offers additional advice to the clinically extremely vulnerable over and above local COVID alert level guidance.

This new guidance aims to strike a better balance between providing practical steps to help keep you safe while reducing some of the potentially harmful impacts on mental and social wellbeing that were associated with previous strict shielding.

It sets out the steps clinically extremely vulnerable people can take to protect themselves at each local COVID alert level.

For more information please go to this link

Advice for clinically extremely vulnerable people in Liverpool is available at: https://liverpool.gov.uk/communities-and-safety/emergency-planning/coronavirus/help-for-people-and-communities/advice-for-extremely-vulnerable-people/

Access the latest Liverpool Covid-19 updates and help and advice here: https://liverpool.gov.uk/communities-and-safety/emergency-planning/coronavirus/

Support groups

From Thursday 24 September, support groups are limited to a maximum of 15 people.

What support is available for vulnerable residents?

Liverpool City Council have established an Isolation Advice Line to help people who have been asked to self-isolate and have NO means of support from friends, family, or neighbours, to remain at home. Get in touch if you need help with:

• Shopping

• Emergency Foodbanks

• Collecting Prescriptions

• Or just having a friendly voice just to speak to

Our advice line 0151 233 3066 is open 8am to 6pm Mon-Fri. An online form is also available 7 days a week at https://liverpool.gov.uk/covidsupport

Support for people on low incomes who are self-isolating (from 28 September)

People in Liverpool who are working or self-employed and on a low income, who must self-isolate due to Covid-19 and cannot work from home, will soon be able to claim a £500 lump-sum payment from the government.

From Monday 28 September, people with Covid-19 symptoms will be required to self-isolate by law. To help those who on low incomes who are unable to work from home, the government has announced it will be providing the £500 ‘Test and Trace Support’ payment. 

The payment scheme will be co-ordinated locally by Liverpool City Council – similar to the business support grant and Without Walls Hospitality Fund. 

The scheme will be expected to be up and running by Monday 12 October. Anyone self-isolating from Monday 28 September onwards will receive a back-dated payment.

You have to be in work or self-employed, but unable to work and, for the mandatory scheme,  in receipt of a means tested benefit.

The application form can be found at https://liverpool.gov.uk/benefits/advice-and-support/coronavirus-benefits-advice-and-support/test-and-trace-support-payment/

What do I do if I see someone breaking the rules?

Environmental health officers have new responsibilities to ensure appropriate public health measures are being followed during the coronavirus pandemic.

The police will be able to take action against those who break these rules, including asking people to disperse and issuing fixed penalty notices starting at £200 for those who participate in illegal gatherings.

People aged 18 or over can be fined:

  • £200 for the first offence, lowered to £100 if paid within 14 days
  • £400 for the second offence, then doubling for each further offence up to a maximum of £6,400

The government has also introduced fines for those who hold illegal gatherings of over 30 people. Holding or being involved in the holding of an illegal gathering of more than 30 people is an offence, and police may issue fines of £10,000 to those who break the law.

You can report a business that should not be open or is open outside of permitted hours or is failing to ensure that staff and customers maintain safe social distancing and hygiene measures here.

We’ll investigate and where necessary deal with the business using powers in the Health Protection (Coronavirus, Business Closure) (England) Regulations 2020, working with police colleagues where appropriate.

Offending businesses could also be issued with written warning and if they continue to flout the regulations, they may be served with a notice to close.

If an individual is breaching restrictions, you can report it to Merseyside Police by calling 101.

Where do I find information on infection rates?

You can find information on the council’s website www.liverpool.gov.uk/covidcases

What do I do if I have symptoms of COVID-19?

More information about symptoms and how to get a test can be found here.