Peace Memorial for Walton Hall Park

Liverpool’s Lord Mayor will unveil a peace memorial in Walton this week to remember those who lost their lives in World War One.

On Friday 7 August Lord Mayor Councillor Tony Concepcion will be joined by veterans and community members at the blessing of the 3 foot high marble memorial in Walton Hall Park.

Lord Mayor Councillor Tony Concepcion said: “I am delighted to be unveiling this commemorative plinth recognising the sacrifices made by those in the First World War and subsequent conflicts.

“The Walton community should be incredibly proud of the effort and work that has gone into ensuring this area of the city never forgets those who gave their life for our freedom.

“I hope this will continue to be a symbol of peace, hope, remembrance and reflection for many generations to come.”

Members of the local community in Walton were concerned that there was no lasting memorial in the area to those who lost their lives during the First World War and subsequent battles.

The initiative was led largely by Councillor Roy Gladden and in 2014 the first phase took shape when a cross of poppies was planted to commemorate the anniversary of the start of World War 1.

Councillor Gladden said: “This memorial really is a testament to the determination of everyone involved in ensuring that Walton and its residents never forget those who have gone to war and never returned home and the daily struggles of those left behind.

“This area is a fitting tribute to our service personnel and I hope that the schoolchildren who will maintain it learn the lessons of the past to ensure a safer future.

“I hope it remains for them and the local community a sign of hope and peace.”

This year the second phase takes place as a 3 foot high black marble plinth is put in place alongside the cross of poppies. The marble plinth will be officially blessed by Reverend Trevor Lathom, Vicar of Walton on the Hill Church.

Schoolchildren from Gwladys St and Alsop schools, in conjunction with Glendales, will look after the site, which is hoped will encourage them to get outdoors and learn about horticulture and wildlife and will hopefully teach the children more about the history of the conflict.