St Julie's woodland

Views wanted over use of new public space in Woolton

People are to be asked for their ideas on how to use three acres of new public space in Woolton.

The private woodland has been handed over by the Trustees of St Julie’s Catholic High School as part of the development of a new £20 million home for pupils which was recently approved by Liverpool City Council’s planning committee.

The council is holding a consultation with the local community, asking for ideas for the use of the site and what they would like to see. The consultation will include feedback forms delivered to the local community and a drop in event.

Proposals could include a children’s play area, woodland trail, cycle routes, trim trail and woodland management if deemed appropriate.

Councillor Malcolm Kennedy, Cabinet member for regeneration, said: “This piece of woodland was previously out of bounds and not available for public use.

“This is a great opportunity for the local community to have a say and input into the plans and will be an integral part of the improvements to the area when the new school is built.

“We are looking forward to working with the local community to come up with ideas for the use of the new open space.”

People with views can email bsf@liverpool.gov.uk or write to Liverpool Schools Investment Programme, Liverpool City Council, Municipal Buildings, Liverpool, L2 2DH, by 31 August.

During the receipt of suggestions and ideas, options will be worked up by a landscape architect and an arboriculturalist who cultivates and manages trees, hedgerows and shrubs.

The ideas will be presented to the community at a drop in session held on Tuesday 15 September at St Julie’s Catholic High School from 4pm – 7:30pm.

The new school buildings are being sympathetically designed in line with the Woolton Village Conservation Area, and will be further away from the Grade 1 listed Woolton Hall than the existing school.

The new complex will also include multi use games area and sports hall which will be available for use by the local community, and will give the school more outside play space than it currently has.

The project is part of the Liverpool Schools Investment Programme, which will see at least 12 new schools built. It was devised as a rescue package following the scrapping of Wave Six of Liverpool’s Building Schools for the Future (BSF) project, and is one of the Mayor’s key pledges.

The school is expected to be completed in the academic year 2016-17.